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TBTF for 1995-04-11: Tracking Web hits; contra telecommuting

Keith Dawson (dawson@atria.com)
Tue, 11 Apr 1995 09:36:04 -0400



>>From Innovation:


TRACKING HITS ON THE NET
Before advertisers are willing to commit big bucks to cyberspace, they need
to know exactly what they're getting for their money. Up until now, all a
Web site owner could know was how many times the site was visited, but
several new companies hope to track and sell more detailed information,
such as how much time was spent per page, what sections of each document
were accessed, where the users live, and even the age, phone number and
buying habits of Web visitors. Of course, much of this information will
need to be volunteered, so companies are strategizing on what types of
incentives will lure customers to divulge their demographic details. It's
anticipated that users will be offered significant discounts off
merchandise in exchange for their information. (Wall Street Journal 1995-04-05
B9)

[This excerpt doesn't name the companies in this niche. One is Utopia, run
by a couple of ex-Apollonites (and ex-Wildfirians), Kee Hinckley and Brian
Holt-Hawthorne, here in Lexington.]

>>From Edupage:


IS TELECOMMUTING AN ENVIRONMENTAL DISASTER?
Technological visionaries proclaim enthusiastically that communications
networks will free workers from the need to live in a city or work in an
office, but environmentalist and political scientist James Snider of the
University of Toronto sees "an environmental disaster of the first
magnitude," as hordes of telecommuters discover the charms of places like
Vermont, and turn it into one huge, sprawling suburb. A one-acre apartment
building with 200 families could turn into 200 five-acre homesteads spread
over 1,000 acres -- a nightmare scenario for environmentalists. (The
Futurist Mar./Apr. '95 p.16)

[One man's Utopia is another's disaster.]

TECHNICAL TRAINING ON THE RISE
With the number of high school graduates estimated to increase by 20% over
the next five years, and military recruiting down, technical schools stand
to gain significantly from the "unsatiated demand for technically trained
people," says an analyst with Smith Barney. "There will be chronic
unemployment well into the year 2000 due to the shift from manufacturing
to a knowledge-based, technically oriented society." (Investor's Business
Daily 1995-04-07 A6)

ONLINE SOUND BITES FROM ACADEMIA
University public relations officers will start spending more time as
"information brokers," says the developer of Profnet -- an Internet-based
service (profnet@sunysb.edu) that lets journalists get professorial sound
bites on breaking news stories via e-mail inquiries to the PR offices of
academic institutions. Colleges and universities currently pay Profnet
$150 to $600 to get added to the list. (Lingua Franca, Mar./Apr.'95, p.4)

PATENT COURT REDUCES ROLE OF JURIES
The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit has issued a ruling that
makes judges, rather than juries, responsible for determining what a patent
covers (based on the patent itself and the accompanying documentation) when
there is a dispute about the nature of the particular technological
innovation described by the patent. Because judges tend to be less
sympathetic to inventors than juries are, the ruling is likely to reduce
the number of plaintiff victories in patent infringement cases. (New York
Times 1995-04-08 p.21)

______________________________________________________
Keith Dawson dawson dot tbtf at gmail dot com dawson@atria.com
Layer of ash separates morning and evening milk.